8 Best Websites for Free Books

In general, if you’re looking for free books, the best places to look are the following, in order of usefulness:
  1. The Online Books Page
    A huge handmade database that aggregates freely available books in all formats, especially from major sites listed below like Google Books, HathiTrust, and the Internet Archive. It is the most useful because you can find comprehensive lists arranged by author, although, for our favorite authors, listed above, we have compiled even better lists here.
    Especially good for: Books organized by author
  2. The Internet Archive (archive.org)
    A massive media archive based in San Francisco, housing mainly public domain materials. The Internet Archive includes digitized library resources, like Google Books, but also includes other media forms like video and audio. Many public domain books from Google Books have been re-uploaded on archive.org, but not nearly all. It is also sometimes prone to religious propaganda or spam, so you may have to tailor your searches.
    Europe has more Internet restrictions and stricter copyright laws, so you will have the best luck if you are logged in from the United States or Canada.
    Especially good for: Any book from 1850 to 1923
  3. Google Books
    Google Books contains millions of digitized books, including both public domain and in copyright. Google Books often has the best collection of very old materials, i.e., before 1850. If you are looking for a rare Puritan work, a very rare hymn, or something from William Carey’s day, Google Books is often the best place to start.
    I also have written a guide to hunting for rare quotes, which works best on Google Books for numerous reasons.
    Especially good for: Magazines, periodicals, anything pre-1850
  4. Project Gutenberg
    Project Gutenberg is the best place to find books in epub and mobi formats, as well as rich-text format or plain text files, all of which are kilobytes instead of megabytes, and have many advantages over reading PDFs.
    Especially good for: Reflowable and searchable formats (epub, mobi, rtf, txt)
  5. LibriVox (for audiobooks only)
    LibriVox is the best source for public domain audiobooks. Occasionally, there are public domain books on LibriVox that are not available in any of these other sites; but, usually, they are popular titles that are already on Project Gutenberg and elsewhere. Often, I find that books that are free on Kindle will end up on LibriVox, so it is nice to switch back and forth, and use the Kindle to annotate or highlight the book as you listen.
    Especially good for: Fiction and adventure
  6. HathiTrust Digital Library
    HathiTrust is similar to Google Books and the Internet Archive, but, like Google Books, it also includes some books with use restrictions. So, sometimes you will find a newer book listed, but you won’t be able to access, or it will ask for an institutional (i.e. library or university) login, or perhaps the file will be read-only.
    Like the Online Books Page, HathiTrust has wealth of metadata, like author’s birth and death date, which makes it easier to find out if you are looking at the right title or not.
    Especially good for: Pamphlets
  7. Amazon’s Kindle Store
    When the Kindle Store began, there was a huge selection of free ebooks; however, all of these were taken directly from Project Gutenberg, so there’s no unique free material. Amazon was also swarmed from 2013 to 2015 by piggybacking public domain publishers, which caused a number of problems when readers are searching for older books—there would be dozens of Kindle editions, with no available rationale for choosing between them. This debacle has unfortunately become the status quo for lovers of resurrected books, since Amazon has continued to change its indexing in ways that only mask the free editions and promote more expensive ones. You can type “free” in the search bar, but it won’t limit your search to free titles.
    For the authors listed above, you will find that we have personally curated lists of Amazon’s free ebook editions, wherever available.
    Especially good for: Quick access & syncing
  8. U-M Library Digital Collections
    The University of Michigan has a fantastic collection of digitized books, but it’s not a good place to start looking. Usually, I end up on U-M’s digital collection because I am looking up a quote from poets and Puritans.
    However, it belongs on this list because I frequently find very rare or very old books there that are not available anywhere else. They have digitized books in their collection that are virtually impossible to even read anywhere else.
    Especially good for: Very old books, 17th and 18th century
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Free Books by Joseph Parker (PDFs)

The following is an alphabetical list of publications by Joseph Parker, D.D., preacher of City Temple, London, with links to PDF copies where available.

Joseph Parker was one of the most prolific writers of the century. More than 60 volumes of his writings are hyperlinked below, and half a dozen others have not been digitized—the complete list is available here. Parker’s output is certainly comparable to that of his friend, Charles Spurgeon. Nearly all of these books are above 300 pages, and there is no way of guaranteeing that this is all that he published, since some of them are very rare.

Most of these books are out of print, but we have worked tirelessly to make his crowning work, The People’s Bible, widely available in digital format.

  1. Ad Clerum
  2. Apostolic Life, As Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles (also published as vol. 23-25 of The People’s Bible)
    vol 1: [Acts 1-12] From the Ascension of Christ to the Withdrawal of Peter;
    vol 2: [Acts 13-19];
    vol 3: [Acts 20-28].
  3. The Ark of God: The Transient Symbol of an Eternal Truth
  4. The Cavendish Hymnal, Compiled for Use in Homes and Churches. [Compiler.]
  5. The Chastening of Love: Words of Consolation for the Christian Mourner
  6. Christian Profiles in a Pagan Mirror
  7. Church Questions
  8. The City Temple: Sermons (also published individually as pamphlets)
  9. Ecce Deus: Essays on the Life and Doctrine of Jesus Christ
  10. Emmanuel
  11. Helps to Truth-Seekers
  12. Hidden Springs
  13. A Homiletic Analysis of the Gospel of Matthew
  14. The Inner Life of Christ as Revealed in the Gospel of Matthew
    vol 1: “These Sayings of Mine”;
    vol 2: “The Servant of All”;
    vol 3: “Things Concerning Himself.”
  15. Might Have Been: Some Life Notes
  16. None Like It: A Plea for the Old Sword
  17. The Paraclete: An Essay on the Personality and Ministry of the Holy Ghost
  18. Paterson’s Parish: A Lifetime amongst the Dissenters (fiction)
  19. The People’s Bible (27 volumes of sermons)
    vol 1: Genesis;
    vol 2: Exodus;
    vol 3: Leviticus to Numbers 26;
    vol 4: Numbers 27 to Deuteronomy;
    vol 5: Joshua to Judges 5;
    vol 6: Judges 6 to 1 Samuel 18;
    vol 7: 1 Samuel 18 to 1 Kings 13;
    vol 8: 1 Kings 15 to 1 Chronicles 9;
    vol 9: 1 Chronicles 10 to 2 Chronicles 20;
    vol 10: 2 Chronicles 21 to Esther;
    vol 11: Job;
    vol 12: Psalms;
    vol 13: Proverbs;
    vol 14: Ecclesiastes to Isaiah 26;
    vol 15: Isaiah 27 to Jeremiah 19;
    vol 16: Jeremiah 20 to Daniel;
    vol 17: Hosea to Malachi;
    vol 18: Matthew (The Inner Life of Christ vol. 1, “These Sayings of Mine”);
    vol 19: Matthew (The Inner Life of Christ vol. 2, “Servant of All”);
    vol 20: Matthew (The Inner Life of Christ vol. 3, “Things Concerning Himself”);
    vol 21: Mark and Luke;
    vol 22: John;
    vol 23: Acts [1-12] (Apostolic Life Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles, part 1);
    vol 24: Acts [13-19] (Apostolic Life Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles, part 2);
    vol 25: Acts [20-28] (Apostolic Life Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles, part 3);
    vol 26: Romans to Galatians;
    vol 27: Ephesians to Revelation.
  20. The People’s Family Prayer Book
  21. Preacher’s Life: An Autobiography and an Album
  22. The Priesthood of Christ: A Restatement of Vital Truth
  23. Pulpit Notes: With an Introductory Essay on the Preaching of Jesus Christ
  24. Six Chapters on Secularism
  25. Springdale Abbey: Extracts from the Diaries and Letters of an English Preacher (fiction)
  26. Studies in Texts (vol 1, vol 2, vol 3, vol 4, vol 5, vol 6)
  27. Today’s Bible
  28. Tyne Chylde: My Life and Teaching (fiction?)
  29. Tyne Folk: Masks, Faces, and Shadows (fiction?)
  30. Walden Stanyer, Boy and Man (fiction)
  31. Weaver Stephen: Odds and Evens in English Religion (fiction)
  32. Wednesday Evenings in Cavendish Chapel: Homiletic Hints
  33. Wilmot’s Child (fiction, under a pseudonym)
  34. The Working Church: An Argument for Liberality and Labour

In addition to the above, many of Parker’s sermons and speeches were published in pamphlets or small volumes:

  1. American War and American Slavery: A Speech
  2. Job’s Comforters: Scientific Sympathy
  3. Ingersoll Answered: “What Must I Do To Be Saved?”
  4. John Stuart Mill on Liberty: A Critique
  5. The Testimony of an Enemy: A Sermon to the Young
  6. A Word for the Present Crisis (search only)

 

Compilations:

  1. Detached Links: Extracts from the Writings and Discourses of Joseph Parker (compiled by Joseph Lucas)

Bibliography of Joseph Parker

The following is a chronological list of publications by Joseph Parker, D.D., preacher of City Temple, London, with links to PDF copies where available.

Joseph Parker was one of the most prolific writers of the century. His output is certainly comparable to that of his friend, Charles Spurgeon. Nearly all of these books are above 300 pages, and there is no way of guaranteeing that this is all that he published, since some of them are very rare.

Almost all of these are out of print, but we have worked tirelessly to make his crowning work, The People’s Bible, widely available in digital format.

Our collection of links below is undoubtedly the most complete list of Joseph Parker books on the Internet, compiled mainly from worldcat.org, which aggregates library data, and The Online Books Page.

  1. Six Chapters on Secularism. 66 pages. 1854.
  2. Helps to Truth-Seekers. 279 pages. 1857.
  3. The Working Church: An Argument for Liberality and Labour. 94 pages. 1857.
  4. Congregational Economist. 1858.
  5. Emmanuel. 161 pages. 1859.
  6. Selected Psalms and Hymns. 1861.
  7. Church Questions. 361 pages. 1862.
  8. Hidden Springs. 413 pages. 1864.
  9. The Chastening of Love: Words of Consolation for the Christian Mourner. 179 pages. c. 1864.
  10. The Cavendish Hymnal, Compiled for Use in Homes and Churches. [Compiler.] 1864.
  11. Wednesday Evenings in Cavendish Chapel: Homiletic Hints. 133 pages. 1865.
  12. Pulpit Analyst. 1866-1870.
  13. Ecce Deus: Essays on the Life and Doctrine of Jesus Christ. 338 pages. 1867.
  14. Springdale Abbey: Extracts from the Diaries and Letters of an English Preacher. 517 pages. 1868.
  15. Ad Clerum. 266 pages. 1869.
  16. The City Temple: Sermons. 798 pages. 1870.
  17. A Homiletic Analysis of the Gospel of Matthew. 358 pages. 1870.
  18. Pulpit Notes: With an Introductory Essay on the Preaching of Jesus Christ. 340 pages. 1873.
  19. Job’s Comforters: Scientific Sympathy. 49 pages. 1874.
  20. The Paraclete: An Essay on the Personality and Ministry of the Holy Ghost. 438 pages. 1874.
  21. The Priesthood of Christ: A Restatement of Vital Truth. 327 pages. 1876.
  22. The Ark of God: The Transient Symbol of an Eternal Truth. 355 pages. 1877.
  23. Tyne Chylde: My Life and Teaching. 352 pages. 1880.
  24. Ingersoll Answered: “What Must I Do To Be Saved?”. 44 pages. 1881.
  25. Adam, Noah, and Abraham: Expository Readings on the Book of Genesis. 1882.
  26. The Inner Life of Christ as Revealed in the Gospel of Matthew. 1881-1882. (Also included in The People’s Bible.)
    vol 1: “These Sayings of Mine”;
    vol 2: “The Servant of All”;
    vol 3: “Things Concerning Himself.”
  27. Apostolic Life, As Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles. 1883.vol 1: [Acts 1-12] From the Ascension of Christ to the Withdrawal of Peter;
    vol 2: [Acts 13-19];
    vol 3: [Acts 20-28].
  28. The People’s Bible. 1885-1895.vol 1: Genesis;
    vol 2: Exodus;
    vol 3: Leviticus to Numbers 26;
    vol 4: Numbers 27 to Deuteronomy;
    vol 5: Joshua to Judges 5;
    vol 6: Judges 6 to 1 Samuel 18;
    vol 7: 1 Samuel 18 to 1 Kings 13;
    vol 8: 1 Kings 15 to 1 Chronicles 9;
    vol 9: 1 Chronicles 10 to 2 Chronicles 20;
    vol 10: 2 Chronicles 21 to Esther;
    vol 11: Job;
    vol 12: Psalms;
    vol 13: Proverbs;
    vol 14: Ecclesiastes to Isaiah 26;
    vol 15: Isaiah 27 to Jeremiah 19;
    vol 16: Jeremiah 20 to Daniel;
    vol 17: Hosea to Malachi;
    vol 18: Matthew (The Inner Life of Christ vol. 1, “These Sayings of Mine”);
    vol 19: Matthew (The Inner Life of Christ vol. 2, “Servant of All”);
    vol 20: Matthew (The Inner Life of Christ vol. 3, “Things Concerning Himself”);
    vol 21: Mark and Luke;
    vol 22: John;
    vol 23: Acts [1-12] (Apostolic Life Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles, part 1);
    vol 24: Acts [13-19] (Apostolic Life Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles, part 2);
    vol 25: Acts [20-28] (Apostolic Life Revealed in the Acts of the Apostles, part 3);
    vol 26: Romans to Galatians;
    vol 27: Ephesians to Revelation.
  29. Every Morning: First Thoughts for First Hours. 1889.
  30. The People’s Family Prayer Book. 390 pages. 1889.
  31. Weaver Stephen: Odds and Evens in English Religion. Novel. 331 pages. 1889.
  32. Someone: Notes for Inquirers Concerning Christ and His Truth. 1890. (Scarce.)
  33. Well Begun. 1893. (Scarce.)
  34. None Like It: A Plea for the Old Sword. 284 pages. 1894.
  35. Today’s Bible. 160 pages. 1894. (link is search only)
  36. Today’s Christ. 1895.
  37. Walden Stanyer, Boy and Man. [Under pseudonym Hugh Kolson.] Novel. 312 pages. 1895.
  38. Wilmot’s Child. [Under pseudonym Atey Nyne.] 194 pages. 1895.
  39. Christian Profiles in a Pagan Mirror. 305 pages. 1896.
  40. Tyne Folk: Masks, Faces, and Shadows. 232 pages. 1896.
  41. Might Have Been: Some Life Notes. 309 pages. 1896.
  42. Studies in Texts (vol 1, vol 2, vol 3, vol 4, vol 5, vol 6). 1898.
  43. Paterson’s Parish: A Lifetime amongst the Dissenters. Novel. 291 pages. 1898.
  44. Preacher’s Life: An Autobiography and an Album. 464 pages. 1899.
  45. The Gospel of Jesus Christ. 1903. (posthumous.)

In addition to the above, many of Parker’s sermons and speeches were published in pamphlets, tracts or very small volumes:

  1. The Testimony of an Enemy: A Sermon to the Young. 29 pages. 1861.
  2. American War and American Slavery: A Speech. 9 pages. June 3, 1863.
  3. John Stuart Mill on Liberty: A Critique. 38 pages. 1865.
  4. The City Temple. (Numbers 1 to 45.) 1869-1870.
  5. The Larger Ministry: An Address. 1884.
  6. Orthodoxy of Heart: An Address. 1884.
  7. Memorial of the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 1887.
  8. The Religious Outlook: An Address. 1890.
  9. Gambling in Various Aspects. (A Speech.) 1897.
  10. Peacemaking: A Sermon for the Times. n.d.
  11. An Address Delivered from the Chair of the Congregational Union of England and Wales. 1901.
  12. A Word for the Present Crisis. 8 pages. n.d, c. 1902. (search only.)

Compilation:

  1. Detached Links: Extracts from the Writings and Discourses of Joseph Parker. Compiled by Joseph Lucas. 503 pages. 1884.

Biographical:

  1. Dawson, Albert. Joseph Parker, D.D.: His Life and Ministry. 184 pages. London: S. W. Partridge & Co., 1901.
  2. Adamson, William. The Life of Joseph Parker, Pastor of City Temple, London. 447 pages. New York: Fleming H. Revell Co., 1902.

 

Review: Orthodoxy

Rating: ★★★★★

Who: G. K. Chesterton was a devoutly Catholic journalist, poet and novelist of the early 20th century. His most apt nickname is “The Prince of Paradox.”

Overview: Orthodoxy is Chesterton’s vision of the world, and it is a vision that does not shy away from paradox. Chesterton unapologetically challenges the zeitgeist as he sees it—he sees an age being overrun by philosophical materialism and biblical criticism. Almost every chapter turns a stereotype on its head: “The Maniac” (ch. 2) challenges the idolatry of logic; “The Flag of the World” (ch. 5) fuses optimism and pessimism and finds the Christian doctrine of the Fall to be the perfect synthesis; “The Romance of Orthodoxy” (ch. 8) challenges the cliche that holiness is necessarily boring.

As an economic liberal and a theological conservative, Chesterton constantly spins around the idea that conservative theology is somehow connected to niggardliness, lifeless moralism, or unsociableness.

Meat: Perhaps the best thing about this book is that few theologically interesting books are such a pleasure to read. Chesterton is always entertaining, but this book is remarkably readable. I went through it in only a few days, and immediately decided that I must re-read it as soon as I can.

I could not possibly summarize here what was profound in this book, but I could note two things:

First, his statement, that “you must love someone for them to be lovable,” has had a tremendous impact on the way we do evangelism in my organization. It frees us from looking for a certain type of people to minister to; it pairs with Schaeffer’s universal statement, “There are no little people. There are no little places.”

Second, the chapter on “The Paradoxes of Christianity” has only grown in relevance as we now live in an information economy, where every passing generation is technology-native. Academics positively fidget at the concept of paradox; it is like trying to swallow a bundle of firewood sideways. Because so many worship information on weekdays but Jesus on Sundays, we struggle intensely at the Bible’s statements about lions and lambs. If Chesterton is right, finding not a balance, but violent synthesis between such paradoxes, may be an important key for building our faith in an age that is, if anything, even more subservient at the altar of reason.

Orthodoxy is, in a way, a culmination of Chesterton’s non-literary essays (The Defendant, All Things Considered, Triumphant Trifles, Alarms and Discursions, etc.), which likewise often involve humor, modern metaphors, parables, paradoxes, and the artful breaking of dichotomies and stereotypes. All of these books are good, but Orthodoxy is by far the best.

Bones: The one struggle of this book is the references. Chesterton played the part of journalist and critic as well as lay theologian, so he often references current trends which are dated, or peculiarly British. I would like to see an edition of this book that uses endnotes to make the reading a little smoother.

Quotes: “I did try to found a little heresy of my own; and when I had put the last touches to it, I discovered that it was orthodoxy.”

“Love is not blind; that is the last thing that it is. Love is bound; and the more it is bound the less it is blind.”

“The men who really believe in themselves are all in lunatic asylums.”

“Angels can fly because they can take themselves lightly.”

“Because children have abounding vitality, because they are in spirit fierce and free, therefore they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, “Do it again”; and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, “Do it again” to the sun; and every evening, “Do it again” to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.”

Read: You can read this book for free over at Amazon, Online-Literature, Internet Archive, or Project Gutenberg—better yet, listen to it for free at LibriVox.

Related: The Lion and the Lamb by Gerald Kennedy.

Free Andrew Murray Books (40+)

Although almost all of Andrew Murray’s 45 books have been in print recently, most readers don’t realize how old they are because of his simple and pointed language. (Not to mention all the updated editions!) Murray was born in 1828 and died in 1917, which means everything published during his lifetime has entered the public domain.

Nearly everything Andrew Murray published is available at one of the links below:

Free Andrew Murray books (PDF) on the Internet Archive (40+)
Free Andrew Murray books in the Kindle Store (15)
Free Andrew Murray audiobooks on LibriVox (20+)
Free Andrew Murray books on the Online Books Page (40+)
Free Andrew Murray books on Project Gutenberg (9)

If you’d like a complete list of everything published in English by Andrew Murray, you’ll find that here.

Free Andrew Murray PDFs

Although almost all of Andrew Murray’s 45 books have been in print recently, most readers don’t realize how old they are because of his simple and pointed language. (Not to mention all the updated editions!) Murray was born in 1828 and died in 1917, which means everything published during his lifetime has entered the public domain.

Below is a list of all of the best PDFs available on the Internet Archive. (Those with asterisks are highly recommended.)

Abide in Christ: Thoughts on the Blessed Life of Fellowship with the Son of God
Absolute Surrender and Other Addresses
The Children for Christ
The Christian Life 
(preached Sept. 1895, Toronto)***
The Cross of Christ 
(excerpt from The Blood of the Cross)
The Dearth of Conversions (booklet)
Divine Healing: A Series of Addresses
Faith in the Power of God
The Full Blessing of Pentecost: The One Thing Needful
Helps to Intercession
 (booklet)
Have Mercy upon Me: The Prayer of the Penitent in the Fifty-First Psalm Explained and Applied
The Holiest of All: An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews
Holy in Christ: Thoughts on the Calling of God’s Children to Be Holy as He Is Holy
Humility: The Beauty of Holiness***
In My Name 
(booklet)
The Inner Chamber and the Inner Life
Jesus Himself: Two Addresses
The Key to the Missionary Problem: Thoughts Suggested by the Report of the Ecumenical Missionary Conference, Held in New York, April 1900
Like Christ: Thoughts on the Blessed Life of Conformity to the Son of God
(sequel to Abide in Christ)
The Lord’s Table: A Help to the Right Observance of the Holy Supper
Lord, Teach Us to Pray
 (excerpt from With Christ in the School of Prayer)
Love Made Perfect (booklet)
The Master’s Indwelling (preached Aug. 1895, Northfield)
The Ministry of Intercession: A Plea for More Prayer***
Money: Thoughts for God’s Stewards
The New Life: Words of God for Young Disciples of Christ
The Power of the Blood of Jesus
The Prayer Life: The Inner Chamber and the Deepest Secret of Pentecost
The Prophet-Priest: Four Addresses Delivered at Mildmay Conference, 1895
The School of Obedience (Addresses at the Students’ Convention at Stellenbosch, South Africa, July 28-31, 1898)
The Spirit of Christ: Thoughts on the Indwelling of the Holy Spirit in the Believer and the Church
The Spiritual Life: A Series of Lectures Delivered before the Students of the Moody Bible Institute
The State of the Church: A Plea for More Prayer
The Supreme Need: In Response to a Call to the Church, in Mrs. Head’s Booklet, “The Forgotten Friend”
Thy Will Be Done: The Blessedness of a Life in the Will of God
The True Vine: Meditations for a Month on John 15:1-5***
The Two Covenants and the Second Blessing
Waiting on God
Wholly for God: The True Christian Life: A Series of Extracts from the Writings of William Law
(edited by Andrew Murray)
Why Do You Not Believe?
With Christ in the School of Prayer: Thoughts on Our Training for the Ministry of Intercession***
Working for God 
(sequel to Waiting on God)

Looking for a complete list of Andrew Murray’s books? You’ll find that here.

God Forsaken of God (G. K. Chesterton)

“Christianity is the only religion on earth that has felt that omnipotence made God incomplete. Christianity alone has felt that God, to be wholly God, must have been a rebel as well as a king. Alone of all creeds, Christianity has added courage to the virtues of the Creator. For the only courage worth calling courage must necessarily mean that the soul passes a breaking point–and does not break. In this indeed I approach a matter more dark and awful than it is easy to discuss; and I apologise in advance if any of my phrases fall wrong or seem irreverent touching a matter which the greatest saints and thinkers have justly feared to approach. But in that terrific tale of the Passion there is a distinct emotional suggestion that the author of all things (in some unthinkable way) went not only through agony, but through doubt. It is written, “Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.” No; but the Lord thy God may tempt Himself; and it seems as if this was what happened in Gethsemane. In a garden Satan tempted man: and in a garden God tempted God. He passed in some superhuman manner through our human horror of pessimism. When the world shook and the sun was wiped out of heaven, it was not at the crucifixion, but at the cry from the cross: the cry which confessed that God was forsaken of God. And now let the revolutionists choose a creed from all the creeds and a god from all the gods of the world, carefully weighing all the gods of inevitable recurrence and of unalterable power. They will not find another god who has himself been in revolt. Nay, (the matter grows too difficult for human speech) but let the atheists themselves choose a god. They will find only one divinity who ever uttered their isolation; only one religion in which God seemed for an instant to be an atheist.”

Source: G. K. Chesterton, “The Romance of Orthodoxy.” Chapter 8 in Orthodoxy. 1908.