Tag Archives: 19th century fiction

Free George MacDonald PDFs

The following is a complete list of George MacDonald’s books that are available for free in PDF format from the Internet Archive. Abridged titles are given in parentheses.

Adela Cathcart, containing “The Light Princess”, “The Shadows”, and other short stories
Alec Forbes of Howglen (= The Maiden’s Bequest)
Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood (★★★★★)
At the Back of the North Wind
Beautiful Thoughts from George MacDonald 
(compilation)
Cheerful Words from the Writing of George MacDonald 
(compilation)
David Elginbrod 
(= The Tutor’s First Love)
Dealings with the Fairies, containing “The Golden Key”, “The Light Princess”, “The Shadows”, and other short stories
Diary of an Old Soul (★★★★)
“The Disciple” and Other Poems
A Dish of Orts
 (essays)
Donal Grant
 (= The Shepherd’s Castle), a sequel to Sir Gibbie
Dramatic and Miscellaneous Poems
The Elect Lady
 (= The Landlady’s Master)
England’s Antiphon
 (a history of religious poetry)
Far Above Rubies
The Flight of the Shadow

The Gifts of the Child Christ and Other Tales (= Stephen Archer and Other Tales)
Guild Court: A London Story (= The Prodigal Apprentice)
Gutta Percha Willie, the Working Genius (= The Genius of Willie MacMichael)
Heather and Snow (= The Peasant Girl’s Dream) (★★★)
“A Hidden Life” and Other Poems
Home Again: A Tale (= The Poet’s Homecoming)
The Hope of the Gospel (★★)
Lilith: A Romance
Malcolm (updated under the same title)
The Marquis of Lossie (= The Marquis’ Secret), the sequel of Malcolm (★★★★)
Mary Marston (= A Daughter’s Devotion or The Shopkeeper’s Daughter)
The Miracles of Our Lord (sermons) (★★★★★)
Paul Faber, Surgeon (= The Lady’s Confession), a sequel to Thomas Wingfold, Curate
Phantastes: A Fairie Romance for Men and Women
 (★★)
The Portent
The Princess and the Goblin (★★★★★)
The Princess and Curdie, a sequel to The Princess and the Goblin (★★★★★)
Rampolli: Growths from a Long-planted Root
Ranald Bannerman’s Boyhood (= The Boyhood of Ranald Bannerman)
Robert Falconer (= The Musician’s Quest) (★★★★★)
A Rough Shaking (= The Wanderings of Clare Skymer)
St. George and St. Michael
Salted with Fire (= The Minister’s Restoration)
Scotch Songs and Ballads
The Seaboard Parish, a sequel to Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood (★★★★★)
Sir Gibbie (= The Baronet’s Song) (★★★★★)
Thomas Wingfold, Curate (= The Curate’s Awakening) (★★★★★)
There and Back (= The Baron’s Apprenticeship), a sequel to Paul Faber, Surgeon (★★★★★)
The Threefold Cord: Poems by Three Friends
The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke: A Study With the Test of the Folio of 1623
Unspoken Sermons (1st series2nd series3rd series) (★★★★★)
The Vicar’s Daughter, a sequel to Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood and The Seaboard Parish
Warlock o’ Glenwarlock
 (= Castle Warlock and The Laird’s Inheritance)
Weighed and Wanting 
(= The Gentlewoman’s Choice) (★★)
What’s Mine’s Mine (= The Highlander’s Last Song)
Wilfrid Cumbermede

The Wise Woman: A Parable (= “The Lost Princess: A Double Story” or “A Double Story”)
Within and Without: A Dramatic Poem

Although all of George MacDonald’s works are out of copyright, this list does not include everything he has written. If you want a more complete list, you can check out our Complete Bibliography of George MacDonald.

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Christmas Carol

Review: A Christmas Carol

Rating: ★★★★★

Full Title: A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas. Dickens divided the original story into “staves” (i.e. stanzas), with the title likewise being an analogy to verse or song.

Who: Charles Dickens, the most famous English novelist of the 19th century.

Overview: A Christmas Carol is Dickens’ compelling and imaginative story of the life of a miser reformed by a tour through time in which he is visited by Ghost of Christmas Past, the Ghost of Christmas Present, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. In all three tenses, Ebenezer Scrooge sees the truth that he had been missing about his own life, the life of his employee, and the effects of his miserable—pun intended—lifestyle on others.

Meat: This story, which many learned growing up from various adaptations such as those of Disney, is much more than a children’s tale. Like the story that follows it, it has elements of horror and fantasy woven into a simple story. And Scrooge is reformed by the vision of the results of his selfishness; in that sense, the story parallels a Christian conversion, and this is clearer in the original book.

Quotes:

“You are fettered,” said Scrooge, trembling. “Tell me why?”
“I wear the chain I forged in life,” replied the Ghost. “I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.”

“For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child Himself.”

“Bah,” said Scrooge, “Humbug.”

“Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” said Scrooge. “But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change.”

You can read A Christmas Carol for free on Kindle, Project Gutenberg, or listen on LibriVox.